Growing older is a luxury not afforded to everyone. But while there may be many benefits to celebrating more birthdays, such as greater life experience and social opportunities, there are also drawbacks. According to some people, workplace discrimination against older workers is preventing them from finding and maintaining gainful employment.

A 63-year-old man who lives in a state outside of Wisconsin recently spoke out about his experience. He was laid off from his job in Aug. 2012 and quickly began searching for a new job. Despite being extremely qualified, he was rejected again and again. The reasons for those rejections? He says it was all because of his age.

His experience is not unique, either. According to one survey, 75% of female workers aged 45 or older say they experience age discrimination when searching for a job. That same study found that 65% of men in the same age group reported having trouble finding work because of their age. An expert on age discrimination from Tulane University affirmed the results of this study, saying that women experience age discrimination much earlier than men.

For some older workers in Wisconsin, it might be hard to determine whether they were rejected for a job because of their qualifications or because of their age. And while many people lose out on job opportunities because of age discrimination, many more also lose out in the workplace. Older workers are unfortunately more likely than younger peers to lose out on raises or be passed over promotions because of their age. When workplace discrimination leads to financial damages such as a loss in income or even emotional trauma, bringing a lawsuit against an employer can be an appropriate course of action.