Employees should be hired, compensated and promoted according to their qualifications and workplace performance. Unfortunately, many Wisconsin employers ignore candidates’ qualifications, shutting out certain workers. Despite the reality that workplace discrimination based on gender and age has a negative effect on both revenue and reputation, it is still a serious problem.

A 2017 study showed that there is a 30% difference in callback rates between men aged 29 to 31 years old and those between the ages of 64 and 66. Women in the same age groups have a 36% gap in callbacks after interviews. According to a study from the National Institute on Aging and the Social Security Administration, age is not just a problem in hiring. The study involved approximately 2,000 adults aged 50 or older, and half reported being forced out of their jobs. Only 10% of those individuals were able to find new employment with the same paygrade.

Another study — this one from Pew Research — found that women are twice as likely to experience discrimination than their male co-workers. A McKinsey survey involving over 70,000 working adults showed that female workers in entry-level positions are 18% less likely to receive a promotion. In that same survey, only 34% of women said that disrespectful behavior is usually addressed quickly.

Companies in Wisconsin usually experience a drop in their reputations and revenues once workplace discrimination claims surface. Some people may be understandably confused about why age and gender discrimination persist in the workplace, but the answers as to why are not totally clear. However, what is clear is that many victims of discrimination need help addressing their financial and emotional damages. Pursuing a discrimination or wrongful termination claim against a current or former employer may help a victim recover compensation for any damages he or she incurred.