Discrimination in the workplace is illegal, and for good reasons. Every worker in Wisconsin should have the opportunity to excel in his or her job regardless of one’s race, gender, religious affiliation and more. Unfortunately, workplace discrimination is still incredibly common, and those tasked with fighting injustice might not be doing as much as they could be.

The Center for Public Integrity recently analyzed data from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and its counterparts that work on local and state levels. They looked at complaint data that covered eight years, ending in 2017. This involved interviewing dozens of victims who had filed complaints with the EEOC as well as going back over hundreds of different court cases. They concluded that the system routinely fails to protect workers.

The study could not identify any group that fared well when making claims. Race claims were treated particularly poorly despite making up the bulk of workplace discrimination complaints. Indeed, many cases are closed before the EEOC even determines whether discrimination took place. Sometimes, cases were closed after doing little more than asking the victim’s employer to provide a statement.

This can be very disconcerting for workers who are dealing with a hostile or discriminatory work environment. Some may feel worried that making a complaint would lead to retaliation and ultimately lose their job. However, victims of workplace discrimination are not without options. An attorney who is well-versed in Wisconsin workplace matters would likely be able to provide insightful guidance on a victim’s options for seeking justice and legal recourse.